“Ain’t Nobody’s Respect Worth More Than Your Own”: African American Children’s Literature, Self-Esteem, Education, and Hope

I asked the students in my Spring 2020 English 725 "African American Children’s Literature" course to produce a piece of public writing that answers the question of Why African American Children’s Literature Matters. Everyone from ill-informed pundits to well-meaning relatives question the value of courses in the humanities: "Why do universities offer such classes?"  Or, … Continue reading “Ain’t Nobody’s Respect Worth More Than Your Own”: African American Children’s Literature, Self-Esteem, Education, and Hope

April 2020 Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity

As we conclude the spring semester and remote teaching in response to the spread of Covid-19, we offer a look at recent faculty, student, and alumni achievements in research, scholarship, and creative activity. Want to catch up on past successes or to find future announcements? Visit our archive of monthly newsletters Reading Matters as well … Continue reading April 2020 Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity

2019-2020 Annual Awards

This evening -- Friday, May 1, 2020 -- should have found us at the Alumni Center for dinner, conversation, and celebration. We always look forward to recognizing our award winners at our Annual Awards Banquet. However, due to this year's outbreak of Covid-19 and the university's restrictions on events, we are not able to hold … Continue reading 2019-2020 Annual Awards

Grad Student Spotlight: Rachael Cox

  While many of our graduate students serve as Graduate Teaching Assistants and complete the M.A. degree full-time, others continue to pursue their current jobs while also taking graduate courses. Rachael Cox (M.A. '21) is one of several high school teachers who pursue the M.A. in English in order to enrich their personal and professional … Continue reading Grad Student Spotlight: Rachael Cox

Grad Student Spotlight: Noelle Braaten and Dustin Vann

  Our M.A. program here at K-State offers a rare opportunity: the ability to combine the Tracks in Children’s Literature and in Creative Writing to develop creative writing skills specifically geared towards children’s and young adult literature. Two English M.A. students graduating this spring, Noelle Braaten (MA '20) and Dustin Vann ('20), recount their experience … Continue reading Grad Student Spotlight: Noelle Braaten and Dustin Vann

February 2020 Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity

In the weeks ahead, we'll be sharing ideas for living through our current cultural moment of social distancing, self-isolation, and mediated communications. For now, though, as we prepare to teach remotely in response to the spread of Covid-19, we offer a look at recent faculty, student, and alumni achievements in research, scholarship, and creative activity. … Continue reading February 2020 Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity

To Avoid Covid 19, Here’s What You Can Do; or, Seuss versus Coronavirus, a New Kind of Flu

Monday was the 116th birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss.  That morning, the Canadian Broadcasting Company (CBC) emailed to ask if I would be willing to talk about Seuss live that afternoon on their Here and Now program. I said I would be glad to, and we had a pre-interview telephone chat. About 40 … Continue reading To Avoid Covid 19, Here’s What You Can Do; or, Seuss versus Coronavirus, a New Kind of Flu

Paperback Pandemonium 2020; or, The English Major’s March Madness

  Who is a better moral guide: Caroline Ingalls or Marmee March? Who is a better scientist: Victor Frankenstein or Lemuel Gulliver? You decide! This March, the Alpha Theta Eta chapter of Sigma Tau Delta is hosting a four-conference paperback book "tournament." Our conference categories are American, British, Global, and Young Adult/Children's literature. We hope … Continue reading Paperback Pandemonium 2020; or, The English Major’s March Madness

Grad Student Spotlight: Molly L. Burt

The conversation surrounding diversity in children’s and adolescent literature has been growing for decades -- despite little change in the publishing industry -- with readers, writers, and educators clamoring for more stories from, about, and for underrepresented groups, such as the LGBTQIA+ community, people with disabilities, and people of color. This movement also opens the … Continue reading Grad Student Spotlight: Molly L. Burt